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Ungquphantsi Likhaya Lam (Home is where the hut is)
written and performed by Luntu Masiza

Coronation
written and performed by Barnaby Simmons

MASO SCHISM
written, devised and performed by Anna María and Catherine Abigail-Ward

Amreeka xx
devised and performed by Saddam Hussain, Kevin Kelly and Ahmed Malek

Lucky Me
devised, written and performed by Arianna Calgaro and Scarlett Love Stitt

Ungquphantsi Likhaya Lam (Home is where the hut is)

written and performed by Luntu Masiza

Poem by Bulumko Masiza

Ungquphantsi Likhaya Lam (Home is where the hut is) follows memories of a young man caught between two worlds in his discovery to manhood and Identity.

Coronation

written and performed by Barnaby Simmons

Is being alone a failure or the ultimate success?

Living alone Liam decides that this loneliness isn’t something to run from. Quite the opposite. Maybe being alone is the source of his power.

MASO SCHISM

written, devised and performed by Anna María and Catherine Abigail-Ward

Who would willingly seek out pain? Where is the line between catharsis and self-harm?

From the hard-learned lessons of childhood suffering to the trials we willingly endure as adults, pain is the ever-present force that shapes our bodies and psyches.

MASO SCHISM is a feminine exploration of the human relationship with pain, and how willing collisions with it can be equal parts destructive and reclamatory; it demands that the audience bear witness to the splintering effect of pain on women, and how they choose to revel in the power of their bodies.

Content warning: This show references sexual assault and includes both actors feature some self-injurious behaviour. All pain-inducing actions were enthusiastically and consensually devised by the actors for themselves, and this work was made with extreme care following trauma-informed intimacy protocols.

Amreeka xx

devised and performed by Saddam Hussain, Kevin Kelly and Ahmed Malek

What does a Bengali and an Arab have in common? Amreeka, baby. Two neighbours are set on a mission to help each other. Based on the Cargo Cult of John Frum movement, actual political facts, fake news, baseball, mommy issues, Friends, George W. Bush genius speeches and many many more great influences. Our play deals with the post traumatic disorder of a character who left the cult of John Frum and wants to start a new life, but his past is hunting him, and now his neighbour.

Lucky Me

devised, written and performed by Arianna Calgaro and Scarlett Love Stitt

“It is foul to do to other men what men habitually, proudly, manfully do to women: use them as inanimate, empty, concave things; f**k them into submission; subordinate them through sex. Right wing women have surveyed the world: they find it a dangerous place.”

Inspired by real politicians and real-life speeches, Lucky Me follows the journey of an anonymous figure as they attempt to seize power from the woman in charge. These women are products of the patriarchal machine, and in this eat or be eaten world must choose to kill for what they believe in or suffer the consequences.

Where to find us

GBS Theatre

Royal Academy of Dramatic Art
Malet Street
WC1E 7JN
+44 (0)20 7908 4800

Getting here

By tube
Goodge Street Station: Northern Line 2 minute walk
Euston Square: Hammersmith and City, Metropolitan, Circle Lines
Tottenham Court Road: Central and Northern Lines
Russell Square: Piccadilly Line

By train
You can easily reach us by public transport links from London's major railway stations. The most accessible include Euston, King's Cross / St. Pancras and Waterloo